The internet is built on video- video is everywhere. It’s our news, it’s social, education, and advertising. What else, it’s noise. All of it. Distracting us from something else online, calling our attention, hyper attention gets the worst of it.

Except video doesn’t work. Most videos fail to meet a simple objective- to connect with the audience in an authentic and meaningful manner. Perhaps this is why we only have 8 5 3-seconds to capture our audience’s attention- there’s so much else out there screaming “watch me!”

In order for video to work, it has to have a purpose and stand out from the noise. It has to be heard at a pitch that’s unique from the constant clutter of the internet.

Video is much more difficult to create well, far more impactful when it works.

It’s interesting how quickly we forget this simple fact. To stand out we have to be ourselves because no one else can do what we do.

As Seth explains it, this happened to copywriters and photographers, too, and it’s happening to video.

Copywriters have an easy job, they write words, and all they need is a pen and paper, although a computer with internet connection helps. If I want to write something I’m not hiring a copywriter when I can do it myself.

Photographers also have it easy. Today, all they really need is a mobile phone since they all have pretty decent cameras built into them. And since I have a phone I no longer need to hire a photographer either.

We cut corners and fail to do ourselves justice by posting something mediocre.

But the value add is how we use our tools. Just because I have a keyboard, it doesn’t mean I’m Hemingway. And I’m certainly not Ansel Adams- the great photographer.

Copywriters need not be threatened by the fact that everyone has a computer with internet, same with photographers. And now, too, video professionals. As storytellers, we add value to a production- the way we frame a shot, light a subject, move the lens through a scene. These are attributes unique to us. There is no commodity and no one can copy us.

Now that everyone has a video camera it doesn’t reduce your value but creates the opportunity to distinguish yourself. Using video well creates incredible connections. We are extraordinary contributors.

What are your thoughts on this article? Let us know in the comments below!

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Comments

  • AMEN ??????

  • Patrick Whalen

    AMEN on his AMEN

    Hey! I’m brand-brand new to this doing it as a professional. You have hit on the primary reason I got into this! There is always a market for quality. Quality can be seen, felt and internalized. So really, the more crap that is out there, doesn’t that make it better for us? There is plenty of business to go around even if you want to be just a mom-and-pops outfit or a national titan.Great article. LIke the writing too.

    • What you can discern as crap might not be the case for a client or someone willing to pay you. When the lines become blurred our job (or selling ourselves) becomes harder.

      • Patrick Whalen

        Yeah, I get that…and I do have that issue. Once I close the deal, I start to move the client to a higher quality…not as add on fees, but as technique. I have a client now doing training videos. I have great sets, lighting and two cameras for these. The first couple he would not take direction…now that he can see the difference, he is more willing to take my direction.

        On the other hand…those blurred lines are always going to be there. At what point do you take the gig, but not put your name on it? HA!

  • James

    “Connect with audience in a meaningful and authentic manner.”
    “To stand out we have to be ourselves because no one else can do what we do.”
    “As storytellers, we add value to a production … There is no commodity and no one can copy us.”

    Thanks for the tidbits.
    Awesome video too. Might have to pick up a new board from #PennyPaintedFades